#changethename Redskins Rally

The last protest I covered on this issue was attended by Senator Paul Wellstone and now, 21 years later, this corporate miss-appropriation of cultural identity issue is STILL sticking us all in the eye.

Lead by Native, local and civil rights leaders from around the country, over 4,000 people protested to stop using the name redskin for the football team. The rally outside the stadium at the Minnesota Vikings vs Washington Redskins game at TCF Stadium on November 2, 2014 demanded the Redskin owner Dan Snyder change the racist name, logos and mascots to something that doesn’t offend the indigenous people of America.

 

Clyde Bellecourt, Winona LaDuke, Spike Moss, Keith Ellison, Minneapolis Mayor Betsy Hodges, former governor Jesse Ventura, the American Indian Movement and others gather in solidarity and statement to #changethename.

Winona LaDuke presents her work to law students at the University of Minnesota. Winona LaDuke presents her work to law students at the University of Minnesota. Winona LaDuke presents her work to law students at the University of Minnesota. Winona LaDuke presents her work to law students at the University of Minnesota. Winona LaDuke presents her work to law students at the University of Minnesota. Winona LaDuke presents her work to law students at the University of Minnesota. Winona LaDuke presents her work to law students at the University of Minnesota. Winona LaDuke presents her work to law students at the University of Minnesota. Winona LaDuke presents her work to law students at the University of Minnesota. Winona LaDuke presents her work to law students at the University of Minnesota. Winona LaDuke presents her work to law students at the University of Minnesota. Winona LaDuke presents her work to law students at the University of Minnesota. Winona LaDuke presents her work to law students at the University of Minnesota. Winona LaDuke presents her work to law students at the University of Minnesota. Winona LaDuke presents her work to law students at the University of Minnesota. Winona LaDuke presents her work to law students at the University of Minnesota. Winona LaDuke presents her work to law students at the University of Minnesota. Winona LaDuke presents her work to law students at the University of Minnesota. Winona LaDuke presents her work to law students at the University of Minnesota. Winona LaDuke presents her work to law students at the University of Minnesota. Winona LaDuke presents her work to law students at the University of Minnesota. Winona LaDuke presents her work to law students at the University of Minnesota. Winona LaDuke presents her work to law students at the University of Minnesota. Winona LaDuke presents her work to law students at the University of Minnesota. Winona LaDuke presents her work to law students at the University of Minnesota. Winona LaDuke presents her work to law students at the University of Minnesota. Winona LaDuke presents her work to law students at the University of Minnesota. Winona LaDuke presents her work to law students at the University of Minnesota. Winona LaDuke presents her work to law students at the University of Minnesota. Winona LaDuke presents her work to law students at the University of Minnesota. Winona LaDuke presents her work to law students at the University of Minnesota. Winona LaDuke presents her work to law students at the University of Minnesota. Winona LaDuke presents her work to law students at the University of Minnesota. Winona LaDuke presents her work to law students at the University of Minnesota. Winona LaDuke presents her work to law students at the University of Minnesota. Winona LaDuke presents her work to law students at the University of Minnesota. Winona LaDuke presents her work to law students at the University of Minnesota. Winona LaDuke presents her work to law students at the University of Minnesota. Winona LaDuke presents her work to law students at the University of Minnesota. Winona LaDuke presents her work to law students at the University of Minnesota. Winona LaDuke presents her work to law students at the University of Minnesota. Winona LaDuke presents her work to law students at the University of Minnesota. Winona LaDuke presents her work to law students at the University of Minnesota. Winona LaDuke presents her work to law students at the University of Minnesota. Winona LaDuke presents her work to law students at the University of Minnesota. Winona LaDuke presents her work to law students at the University of Minnesota. Winona LaDuke presents her work to law students at the University of Minnesota.

Keri Pickett

Keri Pickett is an author, photographer and filmmaker telling the stories of life, family and community with intimacy, honesty and impact. Pickett is Producer, Director and Camera for the award-winning feature documentary film ‘The Fabulous Ice Age’, about the rise and fall of the great American touring ice shows and one man’s quest to save the history, available on Netflix and Amazon. Her short film, 'Steel // Spirit' premiered at MSPIFF and won certificate of excellence in India. Her award-winning books include Love in the 90s; BB and Jo, The Story of a Lifelong Love, A Granddaughter’s Portrait (Warner Books, 1995); Faeries; Visions, Voices & Pretty Dresses (Aperture, 2000); Saving Body & Soul, The Mission of Mary Jo Copeland (WaterBrook, 2004). The recipient of a Jerome and Minnesota State Arts Board grants, three McKnight Foundation Photography fellowships, a National Endowment for the Arts award, and a Bush Foundation Fellow, Pickett’s work is in the permanent collections of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, The Museum of Fine Arts Houston and the Minneapolis Institute of Art.